Blog Revamp – Google+

English: Google+ wordmark

English: Google+ wordmark (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Just in case you are following my goals on my blog revamp, I gave myself the deadline of getting Google+ set up by June 1st. I got my account set up last week but I’m still really clueless about it. It took me awhile just to get back into it today. And even longer to find my way back to my page. This is my first venture into social media and it shows. I’m going to need to spend some time figuring out how this works.

If any one has any pointers for me let me know. If you are on Google+ let me know how to add you to my circles. (I think that is the right term). Boy, do I have a long way to go on this. It is good to learn new things, especially as I grow older and my brain seems stiffer.

Update – revamping my blog

If you have followed the revamping of my blog you will notice that I’ve finished all the posts on the DOABLE approach to telling your family’s tale. So today, I checked back with my plan to see what was next on my list to do.

  • check revamp so far and adjust content plan if needed: Tuesday 14 May
  • move old content to new structure: Thursday, 16 May
  • move forward with new content plan: Monday, 20 May
  • start sharing with Google+: Monday, 3 June
  • start sharing with Pintrest: Monday, 1 July

So today I need to take a close look at my content plan and adjust it with my new structure and goals in mind. I also need to get started on moving my old content into the new blog plan. I think doing this could be very informative as to how my content plan needs to change. I want to make sure that all six step of the DOABLE plan has good ideas for how to carry out that step. With the set of posts I just completed there is some basic information but I’m sure there are lots more ideas and good information that would help in completing different story projects. I’m excited to have completed my revamp this far and anxious to see how the next steps develop.

How are you doing on your own projects? Do you have a story project in the works? I’d love to hear about it.

 

step six: evaluate with the DOABLE Approach to Telling Your Family’s Tales

Step Six: Evaluate

Once your story project is complete it is good to look at how things went. What turned out well, what not so good. What would you do differently next time. Here are some questions that might help you evaluate your story project:

  • What was your favorite part of doing the project?
  • What part are you proudest of?
  • What kind of reactions have you had when you shared it with others?
  • What age groups responded best? Was that the age group you were hoping to reach?
  • What part of the project was the most challenging?
  • What part do you wish you could do over?
  • Did you do what you hoped to with this project?
  • Are you glad you did this project?
  • What did you learn from doing this project?
  • Have you thought of other story projects that would naturally spin-off from this one?
  • If you were starting this project with what you know now, what would you do differently?
  • What was your most successful way of sharing your project?
  • Did any of your sharing efforts fail?

Do you have someone who you can trust to be honest and yet supportive to give you feedback on your project? If so ask them to help you evaluate your results. I hope that you have enjoyed your story project and the journey that you have now completed. I hope that you are excited to do another story project. If so, armed with this knowledge you are ready to go back to step one and pick a new family story project.

I’d love to hear about your story projects. Let me know about it and you might just get featured on a future Telling Family Tales post.

step five: link with the DOABLE Approach to Telling Your Family’s Tales

Step Five: Link

Having made it this far, you deserve to celebrate! That is much of what this step is about, sharing your accomplishment with your family, friends and anyone else who might be interested. There is a good chance that your “why” included hoping that this story project would impact others. Now you are ready to make that happen. Depending on your project some ways of sharing make more sense than others. Here are some ideas on ways to share your story project:

  • share it in person at a family gathering or one on one
  • send it by mail, hard copy, cd or dvd etc.
  • send it by e-mail, dropbox or other electronic methods
  • share it by social mediaFacebook, twitter etc.
  • post it on a blog, YouTube or website etc.
  • share it at other kinds of gatherings like conferences
  • talk about it with friends or other people you meet

Be excited to share your accomplishment. You never know who might be interested. Think about some creative ways to get your story project out there. Just be patient and look for opportunities.

step four: build with the DOABLE Approach to Telling Your Family’s Tales

Step Four: Build

Now is the time to start the real work on your story project! How exciting it that! Hopefully in the analyze step you made a detailed plan with a path to follow to complete your project. If so than follow that plan. If your plan is not so well thought out or detailed than pick a task from your plan and get to work on it.  A few things to keep in mind as you build your story project:

  • make short-term goals
  • adjust your plans as needed
  • when you are feeling overwhelmed move forward in an
  • area that you know how to do
  • you might need to learn some new skills to complete your project
  • remember your “why”
  • find ways to motivate and reward yourself
  • enjoy the journey

The key to this step is to keep moving forward. When an obstacle blocks your path find a way around it. Simple to say, but not always simple to do. But with time and effort you can and will complete your story project.

step three: analyze with the DOABLE Approach to Telling Your Family’s Tales

Step Three: Analyze

Assess:
Now that you have gathered all of your resources it is time to take a close look at what you have. Is it enough to complete your project or do you need to gather more information from other sources? Be honest with yourself and your time. If you don’t have what you need and can’t see having the time to get what you need than take a second look at your project and adjust it to work with what you have. I think it is better to complete a story project than to get stuck on the “perfect” project and never get it finished.

Plan:

Think of planning as the blueprint for your project. You wouldn’t dream of building a house without a blueprint. It would be asking for disaster if you did. Think back on your vision for the project and how you want the finished product to look. I like to start at the end and figure out what I need to get there. There are lots of ways to do project planning so do what works for you. The main thing is to break it down into smaller tasks so you don’t feel overwhelmed and you can measure your progress with the completion of each task. The more detailed you are at this stage the less unexpected hurdles you will find later on. There is no substitute for good planning.

Time Line:

Next step is to give yourself some deadlines. If you have a concrete time when you need the project to get done, I would start with that deadline and work your way back to the present. If all your deadlines are self-imposed you can be more flexible. Look at each task a give an estimate of how long it will take. Add that all up and then give yourself a good buffer, maybe even doubling it to give yourself a deadline. Then I’d look at the first task on your list and give yourself as realistic a due date for that task as you can. Take into account all the other obligations you have. You don’t want your deadlines to make you discouraged. But you also don’t want to procrastinate getting your story project off for over and over so it never gets done.