Horizon Passenger Lists

image of the Horizon passenger list

I recently created a Facebook page for the Martin Handcart Company, since there wasn’t one and since my great-great-grandmother was part of that company. I’ve started to gather information about the Martin Company and today I discovered that Mormon Migration website not only has a list of the passengers on the Horizon (the ship that the Martin Handcart Company took from Liverpool, England to Boston, Massachusetts) but they have images of the pages from the ship’s book where all the names where originally record. I’m really excited to take some time and find Mary Taylor and her family.

I love the power of the internet to share images of documents like these. Have you found something similar through the internet in your family history?

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28 June 1856 – First Sight of Land – Mary Taylor

From the Diary of Samuel Openshaw:

June 28 – Beautiful day and a propitious wind brought us in sight of “Yankee Land” which is the first land that we have seen since we left sight of Ireland and truly it was beautiful. As we entered into the Bay of Boston to behold the rise and decline of hills beyond hills intersecting covered with green grass, cattle grazing, bedecked beautiful houses, rocks rising out of the water as if to resist the force of the waves. It was truly sublime to us to gaze upon it. Our hearts were cheered to behold our destined fort. We cast anchor about nine miles from the city of Boston. A pilot came on board.

From the Life History of John Jaques:

Sat. 28: Beautiful calm morning. Many small vessels seen. A thin sandy broken black streak was pronounced land which proves true, being Cape Cod. Great rejoicing at this. Towards the middle of the day a fresh breeze sprung up which sent us right into the harbor at the rate of 10 to 12 knots per hour. It was truly refreshing to see the houses, trees and the green landscape after being deprived of the privilege for some time. We cast anchor at 6 p.m. within a mile or two of Boston. As we came up the river the passengers were kept down below while the sailors were taking in sails. This was quite a deprivation, but was submitted to with patience. The captain went ashore soon after casting anchor and took with him a letter to the Daily Journal and one to President John Taylor. I saw a steamship about the harbor. There were plenty of little sailing vessels such as yachts and barges. Also a steam packet or two. The view of Boston and the vicinity is very interesting. A small hillock is an island, with trees upon it, is quite a relief to the eye.

From the Journal of Joseph Beecroft:

Saturday 28th I arose about four and looked out of the porthole but could see no land. I went to bed again, and laid till half past 5, washed, shaved, carried up water, and about 7 o’clock I hear a person say he saw land from the first landing on the mast. I ventured up and the 3 of our company to see land for the first time for near 5 weeks. About 9 o’clock we could see land very plain from the ship side of the forecastle. The same Saints seem [p.28] highly pleased with the sight. I feel grateful to my Father in Heaven for his goodness in sparing our lives to see the land of Zion, the land of the free and home of the brave. The land of Joseph’s, choice above all lands. Glory to God in the highest and goodwill to men. I got breakfast after prayer meeting, and then went on deck, and beheld from the ship side the distant hills which indeed appeared lovely to those who have been a long time deprived of the sight of [-]. I stood on the forecastle and with joyous feelings beheld our noble vessel glide rapidly through the yielding waters and bringing us nearer to the sand hills in the distance. About noon we had got opposite the hills which lay on the left side of the ship and in a short time we were opposite Cape Cod Fishery and opposite the Cape Cod Lighthouse. In the neighborhood which was a wind hill and at a short distance from this was a number of houses, the first I had beheld since the channel. We continued our course about a mile or so from the shore and could see one sandbank after another until, I discovered with my small glass, large fields clothed with waving corn and yellowing for the harvest. This sight was truly gladdening to behold. I could see the fences separating field from field. We were all ordered to our berths and having obeyed orders we saw but little of what passed, but though I took off a lock from a box and put on another yet being near our porthole I had a grand chance of seeing village after village as we passed along. We came to a point of land that retired and a great basin was formed, and we could see but the dark mountains in the distance. In a short time we came up with the land again and at this juncture I asked to go out to [-] and got on deck finding a number of Saints up, I thought I had as much right up as anyone so I stayed. For a long way as we went a short distance from one side of the shore while on the other side lay the wide ocean. As we passed along we came opposite village after village with fields interspersed between dotted here and there with trees. Now was a gentle slope inclining to the sea covered with fields, houses here and there, and then an opening beyond which we could see the water as far as we could see. By and by we came to a large [p.29] embankment which we were told was Naval Fortifications. About this time we began to be enclosed on both sides with land at a short distance and passed no less than 3 lighthouses. Here we came to little islands and then we had on our right hand an opening to the wide ocean and ships or vessels gliding in all directions. Every now and then a large boat passed us which skimmed lightly along. The individuals who manned them were dressed elegantly. The sights that presented themselves all on all sides baffles all description. Such was their grandeur, splendor, and sublimity. Among other buildings as we passed was custom house and quarantine hospital, on our right, which when we had neared, the first mate at the orders of the pilot, cast an anchor, at 25 minutes to 6 p.m., for we had got the pilot on board a little before he being brought in a light barge. He is the picture of a Yankee. Having cast anchor I came below deck and found the porthole by our berth crowded with Saints all anxious to catch a glance of things as a view was afforded through the hole. I got tea and attended to writing till we had privilege to go on deck. It was a little before sunset that we got on deck and lovely indeed was the evening as the orb of day went out of sight, right behind the city of Boston. A many boats came past us and two large ships passed for Boston. The shades of night soon followed. The setting of the sun and shut from our sight the lovely landscape that surrounded us and left the eye not to rest upon but the dim outlines of some near objects and the lights of the lamps in Boston and those of a revolving and stationary lighthouse. After chatting a little with Brother Jesse Haven upon the resources of the Americans in case of war &c. I came down and got to bed. Thus ended one of the most important days that ever dawned in my history.

5 June 1856 – Calm and Beautiful – Mary Taylor Project

From Diary of Samuel Openshaw:

June 5 – Also calm and beautiful day. We promenaded on deck. The captain appears to be a kind hearted man. Also the crew and the mates are an agreeable company. The potatoes began to sprit and spoil. Therefore, this day we carried them all on deck to dry. Mother nearly well. Towards evening a side wind which helped us along pretty smartly. Saw several great fish play in the water.

 From the Life History of John Jaques:

Thurs. 5: Calm fine morning. Ship rolled nearly as much last night. Mustard, pepper, salt and tea served out. Two rations of potatoes, vinegar to the 8th and 9th wards. The bedding of the passengers on the top deck carried on the main poop deck to air. Towards midday a light breeze sprang up, which sent us along at about 2 knots per hour. I saw a vessel meet us to our right, another I was told, also met us. We passed a shoal of fish. The breeze increased until night, when it carried us through the foaming waters at the rate of 10 to 12 knots per hour. Had a fellowship meeting in our ward. Quite a good meeting we had.

29 May 1856 – Letter from Edward Martin – Mary Taylor Project

Letter from Edward Martin – May 29, 1856

Ship Horizon, Off Cork, May 29, 1856.

Dear President Richards–It is with great pleasure that I write a few lines, to inform you of our favorable position at the present time; we have a fine morning and all is pleasant around us. The captain, Mr. Reed, is a gentleman in every sense of the word, and I have no doubt but that we shall have one of the most agreeable passages that the Saints have ever had while crossing the Atlantic. He spares no pains to make us comfortable, and offers every facility that will, in the least, be of benefit to us. . . . The officers are all agreeable and obliging. Mr. Stahl does all he can to accommodate; in fact, we could not ask for better treatment if we had it of our own choosing.

The Saints are all feeling well, with a very few exceptions, the few that are sick are not dangerous; the sister that was sick when we left is gradually recovering. We have had one birth, the particulars of which you will have in Elder Jaques’ letter.

The couple you spoke to me about were married last night. The captain gave us the use of the cabin to perform the ceremony in, and I was very glad of the opportunity. It gave us a good chance of introducing some of our doctrines, and of correcting some impressions which had been made upon his mind by newspaper reports and the like.

After you left us on Sunday evening, we lashed all the luggage, and thus prepared for seasickness. The Saints thought us very particular at the time, but morning did not make its appearance before they began to realize the benefit, and expressed themselves that it was good to have a head. The majority were sick on Monday, but only for a short time.

This morning I have been through the ship, and I find all in fine spirits. Elders Haven and Waugh are one with me, in carrying out necessary measures for the the [SIC] comfort and convenience of the passengers, and we have everything our own way. . . . .

I make it my business to visit every part of the ship six or seven times a day, but more particularly when I rise up and before I lie down, and I expect to do so during the voyage. We have got our organization pretty well matured, and all are willing to play their part. We have nine wards, nine cooks, and ten men in each watch of the guard which is kept up night and day.

I feel to thank my Heavenly Father for his goodness to us, and I fully realize the truth of the blessings pronounced upon my head, by you, before I left Liverpool. I cannot but think of the happy days, weeks, and months, that I have spent in the office. I cannot express my feelings, in fact language would fail to do it, but please to accept my heartfelt thanks for every kindness which I have received from you benevolent hand.

Please give my kind love to President Wheelock, and to all the brethren of my acquaintance, and believe me to be your humble servant,

23 May 1856 – Cast off from Liverpool – Mary Taylor

From the Diary of Samuel Openshaw:

May 23 – About two o’clock we were tugged out into the river. The rain poured down pretty freely.

From the Journal of Henry Hamilton:

Friday, 23rd – I commenced to work in the galley. This morning got the fire started &c but it was very smoky. I was over with just as if I had been the funnel myself. We sailed out of the docks.

From the Journal of Joseph Beecroft:

Friday 23rd The day appointed for our sailing. I arose about 4. The seamen were early at work getting the vessel out of dock. At about half past 9, we were getting into the river and before noon we were at anchor opposite Liverpool. We enjoyed ourselves here in getting our food and in passing up and down deck looking at one another and the different vessels that crossed the river. Retired early to rest.

Letter from James and Elizabeth Bleake:

Ship Horizon Liverpool

May 23rd/56

Dear Father and Mother:

We have arrived safely and are all well so far. We have a very comfortable place on board and go out of dock today. Liverpool is the dirtiest place we ever saw. London is exceedingly clean in comparison.[p. 1]

Provisions on board are of first rate quality and plenty for us but we have 15 pounds of Indian meal, 10 pounds of flour, 4 quarter loaves and cheese, raisins, spice, etc. etc. besides. So we have not faith to starve.

Remember us kindly to all inquirers. Farewell and may God our Father bless you both is the earnest [p.2] prayer of your son and daughter, James and Elizabeth Bleak [Bleake]. [p.3]

From Life History of John Jaques:

Fri. 23: About midday moved out of dock into the river. Fine morning . Stiff breeze. Soon after this a little belligerent display occurred between the mates and some of the crew. I did not see the commencement of the affair, but I learned that some of the crew had demurred to obeying orders, and a regular fist cuffing took place. Two or three bloody faces figured in the scene. I was on deck in time to witness a little not very civil jaw between the first mate and one or two of the crew. The mate paced the deck flourishing a Colt’s revolver, and swearing and threatening grandly but did not use the weapon. If necessary use them, and over with it. Threatening and bragging are the business of bullies. Several of the crew were sent ashore, and other men came on board in their place. The mate complained of the refractory ones that they were a set of “blacklegs,” and that they came on board to plunder the passengers and the rest of the crew. They charged him being drunk and “no man.” Meat, peas, biscuits, flour, oatmeal, sugar and tea were served out today.