Horizon Passenger Lists

image of the Horizon passenger list

I recently created a Facebook page for the Martin Handcart Company, since there wasn’t one and since my great-great-grandmother was part of that company. I’ve started to gather information about the Martin Company and today I discovered that Mormon Migration website not only has a list of the passengers on the Horizon (the ship that the Martin Handcart Company took from Liverpool, England to Boston, Massachusetts) but they have images of the pages from the ship’s book where all the names where originally record. I’m really excited to take some time and find Mary Taylor and her family.

I love the power of the internet to share images of documents like these. Have you found something similar through the internet in your family history?

Advertisements

29 May 1856 – Letter from Edward Martin – Mary Taylor Project

Letter from Edward Martin – May 29, 1856

Ship Horizon, Off Cork, May 29, 1856.

Dear President Richards–It is with great pleasure that I write a few lines, to inform you of our favorable position at the present time; we have a fine morning and all is pleasant around us. The captain, Mr. Reed, is a gentleman in every sense of the word, and I have no doubt but that we shall have one of the most agreeable passages that the Saints have ever had while crossing the Atlantic. He spares no pains to make us comfortable, and offers every facility that will, in the least, be of benefit to us. . . . The officers are all agreeable and obliging. Mr. Stahl does all he can to accommodate; in fact, we could not ask for better treatment if we had it of our own choosing.

The Saints are all feeling well, with a very few exceptions, the few that are sick are not dangerous; the sister that was sick when we left is gradually recovering. We have had one birth, the particulars of which you will have in Elder Jaques’ letter.

The couple you spoke to me about were married last night. The captain gave us the use of the cabin to perform the ceremony in, and I was very glad of the opportunity. It gave us a good chance of introducing some of our doctrines, and of correcting some impressions which had been made upon his mind by newspaper reports and the like.

After you left us on Sunday evening, we lashed all the luggage, and thus prepared for seasickness. The Saints thought us very particular at the time, but morning did not make its appearance before they began to realize the benefit, and expressed themselves that it was good to have a head. The majority were sick on Monday, but only for a short time.

This morning I have been through the ship, and I find all in fine spirits. Elders Haven and Waugh are one with me, in carrying out necessary measures for the the [SIC] comfort and convenience of the passengers, and we have everything our own way. . . . .

I make it my business to visit every part of the ship six or seven times a day, but more particularly when I rise up and before I lie down, and I expect to do so during the voyage. We have got our organization pretty well matured, and all are willing to play their part. We have nine wards, nine cooks, and ten men in each watch of the guard which is kept up night and day.

I feel to thank my Heavenly Father for his goodness to us, and I fully realize the truth of the blessings pronounced upon my head, by you, before I left Liverpool. I cannot but think of the happy days, weeks, and months, that I have spent in the office. I cannot express my feelings, in fact language would fail to do it, but please to accept my heartfelt thanks for every kindness which I have received from you benevolent hand.

Please give my kind love to President Wheelock, and to all the brethren of my acquaintance, and believe me to be your humble servant,

23 May 1856 – Cast off from Liverpool – Mary Taylor

From the Diary of Samuel Openshaw:

May 23 – About two o’clock we were tugged out into the river. The rain poured down pretty freely.

From the Journal of Henry Hamilton:

Friday, 23rd – I commenced to work in the galley. This morning got the fire started &c but it was very smoky. I was over with just as if I had been the funnel myself. We sailed out of the docks.

From the Journal of Joseph Beecroft:

Friday 23rd The day appointed for our sailing. I arose about 4. The seamen were early at work getting the vessel out of dock. At about half past 9, we were getting into the river and before noon we were at anchor opposite Liverpool. We enjoyed ourselves here in getting our food and in passing up and down deck looking at one another and the different vessels that crossed the river. Retired early to rest.

Letter from James and Elizabeth Bleake:

Ship Horizon Liverpool

May 23rd/56

Dear Father and Mother:

We have arrived safely and are all well so far. We have a very comfortable place on board and go out of dock today. Liverpool is the dirtiest place we ever saw. London is exceedingly clean in comparison.[p. 1]

Provisions on board are of first rate quality and plenty for us but we have 15 pounds of Indian meal, 10 pounds of flour, 4 quarter loaves and cheese, raisins, spice, etc. etc. besides. So we have not faith to starve.

Remember us kindly to all inquirers. Farewell and may God our Father bless you both is the earnest [p.2] prayer of your son and daughter, James and Elizabeth Bleak [Bleake]. [p.3]

From Life History of John Jaques:

Fri. 23: About midday moved out of dock into the river. Fine morning . Stiff breeze. Soon after this a little belligerent display occurred between the mates and some of the crew. I did not see the commencement of the affair, but I learned that some of the crew had demurred to obeying orders, and a regular fist cuffing took place. Two or three bloody faces figured in the scene. I was on deck in time to witness a little not very civil jaw between the first mate and one or two of the crew. The mate paced the deck flourishing a Colt’s revolver, and swearing and threatening grandly but did not use the weapon. If necessary use them, and over with it. Threatening and bragging are the business of bullies. Several of the crew were sent ashore, and other men came on board in their place. The mate complained of the refractory ones that they were a set of “blacklegs,” and that they came on board to plunder the passengers and the rest of the crew. They charged him being drunk and “no man.” Meat, peas, biscuits, flour, oatmeal, sugar and tea were served out today.

21 May 1856 – Boarding the Horizon – Mary Taylor

The Horizon by Kenneth L. Rasmussen

On May 21st and 22nd 1856 the passengers boarded the Horizon in preparation for sailing to Boston Harbor. This included my great-great-grandmother Mary Taylor, her husband, William Upton, her parents and an aunt. I’ll be posting info about her journey for the next 5 months.

From the Journal of Henry Hamilton:

Wednesday, May 21st – Landed at 11 a.m. As soon as we got upon the pier, there was men, lots of them that come to us, we’ll take your things &c &c. Aren’t you some of the brethren? What brethren say I. So they told me they would go on that way to get [-] boxes to carry. I & Joseph then went to see about the porter that Pastor Parks told us about, but could not find him. We returned to the boat, saw a Brother Jessie [Jesse] Haven. We then got a porter to take our chests off to the Horizon, the vessel that we was to go with. We then went & had some dinner & went to the office to see about our going away. We got that settled that I was to go as passenger cook. So we went & got mattresses bought &c. Slept on board the vessel all night.

From the Journal of Joseph Beecroft:

Wed. 22nd [May 21, 1856] We arose soon and I wrote and after breakfast we got our luggage [to] our office in Islington Street and got names signed to the ship and then the luggage to the ship in Bramley Moore Dock and our tickets for our certificates. [At] night I got my certificate for my birth and had a walk in Liverpool, retired to bed.

We came on board in the afternoon and of all the sights that I ever saw, it was the most astonishing. Luggage was piled on a piece of ground in front of the ship to a considerable, and hundreds were busy in getting in their [p.8] luggage. And about half past 10 or 11 I went to bed , where my wife and son already were, but I did not sleep until the noise of talking and laughing had subsided. I then slept better than I had done for some time and awoke refreshed in body and mind, grateful to my Father in Heaven for his blessings and favors.

From the Life History of John Jaques:

Thurs. 22: About 7 o’clock I sent my wife, her sister, Tamar, and my daughter, Flora, in a cab to the Horizon, 2/6. I went with our luggage in the cart 4/, and 6 demies to the man. Got Brother Thomas Dodd to assist me in getting our things on board. Paid him 1/0. We engaged berth number 401 for myself and wife, and the half of number 400 for her sister, Tamar, both on the second or lower deck. Ann Johnson, servant of Brother Linforth was to have the other half of 400. Brother W. Paul and wife engaged the berth next to mine. Brother William Taylor and wife from Stratfordshire had engaged one next to theirs. We did not get out of dock this day. The ship had 856 passengers on board, 635 of whom were P.[Perpetual] E.[Emigrant] Fund emigrants, 212 ordinary , and 7 cabin passengers. Elder Edward Martin, president of the company, assisted by Elder Jesse W. Haven and George P. Waugh; steward, John Thompson; cook, Henry Hamilton and Joseph Jackson; historian, myself; sergeant of the guard, Elder F.C. Robinson. We made our beds of our spare clothing, bought a pound of molasses 3 demies, a pound of marine soap 6 demies, some round lamp wick, six one penny packets of violet powder, and six one penny boxes of wax lights and six red herrings.

More info on the Horizon: Liverpool to Boston.