23 May 1856 – Cast off from Liverpool – Mary Taylor

From the Diary of Samuel Openshaw:

May 23 – About two o’clock we were tugged out into the river. The rain poured down pretty freely.

From the Journal of Henry Hamilton:

Friday, 23rd – I commenced to work in the galley. This morning got the fire started &c but it was very smoky. I was over with just as if I had been the funnel myself. We sailed out of the docks.

From the Journal of Joseph Beecroft:

Friday 23rd The day appointed for our sailing. I arose about 4. The seamen were early at work getting the vessel out of dock. At about half past 9, we were getting into the river and before noon we were at anchor opposite Liverpool. We enjoyed ourselves here in getting our food and in passing up and down deck looking at one another and the different vessels that crossed the river. Retired early to rest.

Letter from James and Elizabeth Bleake:

Ship Horizon Liverpool

May 23rd/56

Dear Father and Mother:

We have arrived safely and are all well so far. We have a very comfortable place on board and go out of dock today. Liverpool is the dirtiest place we ever saw. London is exceedingly clean in comparison.[p. 1]

Provisions on board are of first rate quality and plenty for us but we have 15 pounds of Indian meal, 10 pounds of flour, 4 quarter loaves and cheese, raisins, spice, etc. etc. besides. So we have not faith to starve.

Remember us kindly to all inquirers. Farewell and may God our Father bless you both is the earnest [p.2] prayer of your son and daughter, James and Elizabeth Bleak [Bleake]. [p.3]

From Life History of John Jaques:

Fri. 23: About midday moved out of dock into the river. Fine morning . Stiff breeze. Soon after this a little belligerent display occurred between the mates and some of the crew. I did not see the commencement of the affair, but I learned that some of the crew had demurred to obeying orders, and a regular fist cuffing took place. Two or three bloody faces figured in the scene. I was on deck in time to witness a little not very civil jaw between the first mate and one or two of the crew. The mate paced the deck flourishing a Colt’s revolver, and swearing and threatening grandly but did not use the weapon. If necessary use them, and over with it. Threatening and bragging are the business of bullies. Several of the crew were sent ashore, and other men came on board in their place. The mate complained of the refractory ones that they were a set of “blacklegs,” and that they came on board to plunder the passengers and the rest of the crew. They charged him being drunk and “no man.” Meat, peas, biscuits, flour, oatmeal, sugar and tea were served out today.

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