Our Digital Footprints

I read an article today on leaving our own digital footprints on AmericanFootprints.com. They offer a framework for creating your own digital memoir. While I’m not ready to sign-up it did get me thinking about what I’m leaving behind that really shares about who I am and what my life was like. Are there small adjustments in the way I live life everyday that would change the stories, feelings and memories that will still be around when I’m gone? I don’t know the answers but I agree with the idea that we need to keep things like this simple or they just don’t get done at all. Simple and incomplete is so much better than nothing at all. I remember hearing someone say once “what do you wish your great-grandmother had record?” What do I want my great-great nieces and nephews to know about me and why I made the choices I’ve made in my life?

I spend a chunk of time everyday organizing and tracking what I need to get done. I wonder if with a bit of a shift I could be recording simple stories about my day? The facts of my life are not what is important, it is the stories that make me who I am. Just some random thoughts for today. What are you doing to record your own stories?

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Pupdate: 2 fables by Fable

Fable - 13 September 2014

Fable – 13 September 2014

Fable is trying her hand at writing fables this week. Her biggest challenge is coming up with the moral to the story. If she didn’t have to come up with that there would be a lot more fables to tell. I’m wondering if she should just write her stories and see if someone else can help her with what the fable teaches?

The Ice Cube and the X-pen – by Fable

I was so hot and panting this afternoon after a fun romp in the big grassy place. My new mom put me in my x-pen and then gave me a special treat. A rectangular toy with almost no color and it was so cold! She called it an ice cube. I loved the way it shot across the wood floor every time I punched it with my paws. It is the best feeling watching it sail across the floor. I hit is so hard that it broke in two and then I had two toys. Double joy! But oh the anguish when both my ice cubes got stuck behind the back of the x-pen. I couldn’t help but cry out in my disappointment. Then joy of joy, mom crawled into my x-pen and saved my ice cubes. I had so much fun playing with them. Then I realized that my new toys kept getting smaller and small and first one disappeared and then the other. But it wasn’t as painful as when I could see them but not reach them. So all pups and dogs out there, enjoy your toys while you can. You never know when they might disappear, like my ice cubes did today.
The Stairs – by Fable
I learned to go up the stair within 24 hours of being in my new home. That was way easy. I watch my big sister Emma and used my natural jumping ability. It only took a few tries to master that direction. But down, that was getting me. I couldn’t even bring myself to go to the edge of the first step. I tried but something always stopped me about a foot back. No amount of self talk would get me to move. My mom would pick me up and carry me to the bottom step and set me down so I could practice. That wasn’t bad. Then we progressed to two steps up and that took lots of positive self talk to get my feet to move. I wished big sister Emma was here so I could watch the way she went down stairs. I didn’t pay close enough attention before she left for Doggy College.

This morning my papa decided to help me with the stairs. He put me on the top step (not the way mom did) and helped me put my front feet on the step below. My back feet naturally followed. He did it again and again until we got to the bottom of the stairs. After I took care of my business outside, we went back upstairs so I could eat. Then Papa went outside to water the grass. I wanted to go with him, so while he was gone, I took a deep breath and walked to the top of the stairs. Then I put my front paws down on the step below. It was kind of scary but I tried not to think about it too much. I’d just practiced this stair thing after all. I could do it. So I tried again and again and when Papa came back inside he was so surprised and pleased to see me waiting for him at the bottom of the stairs.

Next time you have to do something hard, remember what I learned on the stairs today. If you take a big obstacle one small step at a time you can do more than you think you can.

Emma: No word yet other than that she made it to San Rafael. At this point no news is good news. The initial evals for breeding takes about two weeks. Banta is our only dog who made it passed the first two weeks of breeder evals. Dune was the shortest with only two days.

Writing Challenge: day 58

The last day of the Armchair Genealogist‘s writing challenge has finally come. Kind of unbelievable. At times I wondered if I’d ever get through it but I was determined, no mater how long it took me to complete this. One of my goals with the challenge was to make a regular habit of doing something toward my Dad’s Key West history. For the most part I’ve accomplished that. I’ve also learned how much I still have to learn about writing creative non-fiction. But I have a plan for continuing to move forward with the history and improving my writing skills. Here are highlights of Lynn’s advice on the last day of her 28 day family history writing challenge:

  •  Take a lesson from this challenge and enlist the help of others.
  •  Continue to improve your craft.
  •  Find your ideal time.
  •  Plan your writing.
  •  Seek deadlines and accountability.
  •  Believe you are a writer.

The last one hit me the hardest. I don’t know how many times I’ve said, “I’m not a writer.” I am now vowing to never utter those words again. I certainly won’t become a writing if I keep saying that. To accomplish my goals I need to become a writing. The other one that needs some attention is finding an ideal time to write. While I’ve gotten this done almost everyday during the challenge, I haven’t been consistent with the time. So I’m setting a goal to figure out when that is and try it and adjust until I really do find the best time to write everyday.

Thanks to all of you who have stuck with me through this challenge. I think I’ll do at least weekly updates on how the Key West history is doing.

Writing Challenge: day 57

Second to the last day of the Armchair Genealogist‘s writing challenge! And fittingly today’s topic is about last lines. I’ve honestly never thought about this topic before. At least not consciously. Just another example of how much I have learned and still have to learn about writing. Here are the things that Lynn suggested to consider in writing great last lines in a family story:

  • Your last lines certainly need to bring a sense of finality to your story.
  • Your last line should resonate with your theme.
  • Your last line should be about your main ancestor and his final thoughts.  If you’re writing a memoir, then your final thoughts should be expressed in those last sentences.
  • Your last lines should demonstrate your ancestor’s growth or your growth through your family history journey.
  • Your last lines should slow the pace of your story down and ease the reader to the end.
  • Your last lines can teach a lesson or moral (of course without being preachy).
  • Your last lines should leave your reader with an understanding of how your ancestor’s life proceeded after the story is over.
  • Your last lines should be uplifting and hopeful.

Lynn also talked about writing the ending in advance. It helps in plotting the story to come full circle to the ending you want. She also has four formats to try in writing the last line.

  1. As a line of description
  2. Demonstrating your ancestor’s actions
  3. As a line of dialogue by your ancestor
  4. As an internal monologue by your ancestor or a thought or feeling by you the narrator.

Another excellent lesson by Lynn Palermo!

Writing Challenge: day 56

“Reading Like a Writer” is the topic for today in the Armchair Genealogist‘s writing challenge Day 26. Just two days to finish. I’ve loved reading since the 5th grade when my teacher taught me to read for the enjoyment not so I could write a book report. Most of my reading in the last few years has been audio books that I listen to while I make dinner and do the dishes etc. Since starting this challenge I’ve noticed some of the tools authors use to tell their story that I’ve never noticed before. From reading the list below I see there are still more ways I can learn from my reading. Here are Lynn’s suggestions on how reading can help us to become better writers:

  1. Concentrate on reading books in your genre but don’t limit yourself. Read a wide range of books in a wide range of genres.
  2. Just like writing make reading a habit – a daily habit.
  3. Set a reading goal, I try to read 3 books a month.  I wish it could be more. Set a goal based on your own schedule. Join a book club; this is one of the best ways to make sure you’re reading on a regular basis and exposes you to a variety of books that others are choosing for you.
  4. Carry your reading with you; make the most of every opportunity to read.
  5. Read for enjoyment but also analyze character, plot and theme when reading.
  6. If a book resonates with you, read it a second time focusing on the more specifics of the story structure, the writer’s style and choices.
  7. Pay attention to the words, the preferences the writer makes and the organization and flow of those words.
  8. Don’t be afraid to take notes. It deepens your learning, gives you time to absorb what you’ve read and provides a resource for future reference.
  9. Write a review of a book you read, this provides you the opportunity to share some lessons you learned or explore some of the ideas it brought up for you.
  10. Read a wide range of writers from great writers, classic writers to current writers and unknown writers. There is a writing lesson in every book.
  11. Don’t waste time reading a book you don’t enjoy or understand. There are too many books in the world, put it down and move on to the next.
  12. Take cues from other writers.  Experiment with concepts you see other writers doing, then take it one step further and manipulate it and make it your own.

Writing Challenge: day 55

It is my 55th day in the Armchair Genealogist‘s writing challenge but it is her 25th day and the topic is “Improving Your Story Through Feedback”. Lynn gives some consideration in finding a group to give valuable in improving the quality of our family stories. Here they are:

  • Critique groups and writing groups are not necessarily the same thing.
  • In-Person or Online Groups. There are pros and cons to both in-person and online groups.
  • In-person groups can be more restrictive.
  • On-line Groups offer flexibility.
  • Open and closed groups. 
  • Genre-based groups. 
  • Consider a single critique partner.
  • Don’t be discouraged if your first group doesn’t work out.

I’m glad that we have a writing coach to work with on this project. I think her teaching will really help me progress faster and get a better story in the end. Today writing exercise was to take one sentence in which you are “telling” and revise it into a “showing” sentence. Here is my original sentence:

Ray started the 2600 miles journey across the southern United States on Labor Day weekend.

Here is my attempt at showing:

The warm air flowed across the drop of sweat that trickled down the side of his check as Ray crossed into Arizona. At 60 miles per hour the telephone poles clicked by at an amazing speed and flags fluttered on many of the houses that he passed by.

I still feel really clueless even though I’ve learned lots in the last couple of months. So much more to applying these principles but at least I have some awareness of them now. “One day at a time,” I keep telling myself.

Writing Challenge: day 54

Day 24 of the Armchair Genealogist‘s writing challenge featured guest author Jean-Francois de Buren. He gave an excellent list of things to think about while working on a family story project. Lots of great food for thought here:

  • The story must be personally resonant. The story must be meaningful to you first and foremost. If you are not moved by it, do not proceed, it will simply be too difficult, and the result will be lackluster. While you might be writing your family story to ultimately share with other family members, this cannot be your primary motivation. If you write for others in the hope of receiving praise for your efforts, you will never receive the level of acclaim you desire, no matter how effusive it is.
  • Start modestly. Start small and see where it the story takes you. It does not need to be a multi-generational epic to have impact.
  • It should feel original to you. While any great story will have timeless themes, the story should still feel real to your family. What you write will inspire others to be sure, but in ways that you can never predict, nor should you try. Authenticity is key here. If you do not believe in what you are writing it will come through.
  • Be forthright. Don’t be afraid to search for and tell the truth. Family stories are often embellished over time, and the stories we choose to tell say something about us. What really happened can often times be more interesting than the stories that were handed down. If you don’t know what “really” happened, feel free to offer open-ended questions that will leave the reader thinking. Have a point-of-view.
  • Think about milieu. Historical context is critically important. Your ancestors certainly did not leave their home countries on a whim. What was the social, religious, racial tenor of the time?
  • It should have drama. It is easy to fall into the trap of focusing on facts and figures when it comes to family history, but that alone does not make for great storytelling. Wade into the emotions of your ancestral protagonists. If you were in their shoes, what would you have felt, what would you have done?
  • Trust yourself. This is critical. The story that you will tell has waited for you to tell it—own that fact. Once you get into the story and feel the emotional power, it will take you where you need to go.
  • Give yourself a deadline. The process cannot be fully open-ended. A goal is key. It could be a deadline to finish the first chapter, the first 20 pages or the first draft. If you are committed to the process, the muse will marshall the resources to assist you. Showing up matters.
  • Revise and edit. Once you feel it is exactly where you want it to be, let two people whom you trust to look at it. Take a deep breath and know that the comments are there to make your work better. Their tasks are different, so chose wisely. One is looking at the story from a macro level. Is the story compelling? Does it have drama? Would someone who does not know me or my family want to read it? The other is looking at the story from a micro level. Checking grammar, spelling, syntax and sentence structure.
  • Enjoy the process. Let go of the fear of failure, the final product is already within you simply waiting to be expressed. Take the plunge.

Here are two of Jean-Francois de Buren’s projects that you might be interested in. He wrote about his literary journey with his ancestor   http://www.common-place.org/vol-13/no-04/tales/ and an adaptation of his ancestor’s journals can be found on Amazon:  http://www.amazon.com/Voyage-Across-Americas-Journey-Henri/dp/2940531021/